Some Important Information

I teased you last week by letting you know that I am working on a new project. I’m ready to share with you what that project is. Now, it won’t be completely released for a little while longer, but I don’t have a new site and a Facebook page that you all can follow to get more up-to-date information about its release.

Instead of taking one day a week on this blog writing about haunted places, I decided a more fun way to do things would be to start a podcast. So, without further ado…

Okay, I’ll tell you. Please say hello to Macabre at Midnight.

This will be a weekly podcast that explores the weird, haunted, and murdered stories of the world.

It will work like this. I’ll share the story we will be talking about and then I will talk about some of my theories. The podcast will involve just me, but I am looking at having guests on the show so that everybody can enjoy the point of view of another person.

Eventually, I hope I will subscribers to the show that will share some of their ghost stories, which I will reiterate on the podcast.

If you are interested in following Macabre at Midnight, you can find it here and here

I will be making a designated Twitter for it as well, so be on the lookout for it. My podcast, once released, will be available through all of the podcast streaming services such as Google, iTunes, and Spotify. You can also find me on Podbean.

I hope to see everyone there.

 

Important Books by Black Authors

Today I want to take the opportunity to use my platform to showcase some amazing authors of color. I may not have a large following, yet, but I want to help any way I can. All of the books have links, so if any of them sound interesting, please check them out.

Friday BlackNana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah

Friday Balck is his debut novel and was named a “5 under 35” honoree by the National Book Foundation. This book is filled with satirical stories about the psychic and physical trauma of black life in America. It paints racism in a new light and is a must-read.

Wandering In Strange LandsMorgan Jerkins

This is Jerkin’s second book, and in it, she recreates her ancestor’s migration across the country.

Such a Fun Age – Kiley Reid

This is Reid’s debut novel and immediately hit the New York Times bestsellers list. Emira Tucker, a young black woman, is accused of kidnapping when a security guard assumes she has abducted the white girl she is taking care of. You will get to experience the uncomfortable mess that Emira’s boss makes of the situation as well.

Well-Read Black Girl – Glory Edim

This is an inspiring collection of essays by black women and curated by Glory Edim.

I Almost Forgot About You – Terry McMillan

This book is from the same woman who brought you How Stella Got Her Groove Back. It is an inspiring story about a woman who shakes up her life to discover more meaning.

Loving Day – Mat Johnson

This book is hilarious and moving wrapped in one, just like it wraps the opposites in the world bound in love.

Behold The Dreamers – Imbolo Mbue

This is another debut novel. It deals with marriage, immigration, class, race, and the trapdoors within the American Dream. This is all about Cameroonian couple creating a new life in New York during the Great Recession.

Luster – Raven Leilani

This is Raven’s debut novel and is a sustaining coming of age story. Edie is a young painter who is stumbling through her 20s, making questionable decisions. She soon starts a relationship with an older man who is in an open marriage. He invites her to his home where she meets his adoptive daughter, Akila.

The Vanishing Half – Brit Bennet

This new book by Brit Bennet focuses on twin sisters who escape their black community in pursuit of two different futures. One sister gets pulled back to the black community while the other passes as white and hides her past from her husband. Their daughters cross paths, which forces them to explore any lingering trauma they may have from their past.

Long Way Down – Jason Reynolds

His book has been decorated with awards, for good reason. The entire novel takes place within 60-seconds as the narrator takes an elevator ride to meet his brother’s murderer with a gun tucked into his pants, and wrestles with whether or not he should kill the man.

Where Has She Been?

You may be wondering, where did she go? And for good reason.

I haven’t written a blog post since last November, but I have been busy working on a new project. I have been working on the second book in the Wolfsbane Chronicles, but I have something new that I am working on.

I’m working on creating a podcast. My podcast won’t have to do with writing. Instead, I am going to be exploring another interest of mine, murder, mystery, and ghosts. I had started doing a weekly haunting story on this blog, but as you have seen, those stopped as well.

I’m going to be transitioning my ghost stories and such to a different blog, just to keep things more organized. You can still come here to find updates about my books as well as some updates about book releases. I should have a blog coming out at least once a month here, maybe more. It will all depend on book news.

Once I have my new blog up and running, and the podcast, I will share more information about it. I am still in the planning phase. I haven’t even come up with a name for the podcast yet. I would also like to have some guests that like talking about ghosts and murder, but I will have to do some research on where to find them.

Just be on the lookout for more information. Until then, keep reading.

Haunted Fort Delaware – Delaware

This week we are traveling to the North into Delaware, one of the first states to be settled. We’ve talked about strange monsters that lurk in the woods, creepy hotels, and haunted prisons, but today, we travel to a military base.

Fort Delaware has been inactive for a while now, but that only means it doesn’t serve as a harbor defense facility. It is definitely active with lots of paranormal activity. The military has own Peas Patch Island since the 1810s. They seized the land from a person named Doctor Gale, who had been using the space as his own personal hunting grounds.

The French would then build the fort in order to protect the state from the Confederates and other types of enemies. Captain Samuel Babcock, in 1812, oversaw the work to make the fort stronger. They strategically placed seawalls and dikes, and they started building the star fort in 1817.

However, because of damage and other delays, the construction took a lot longer to finish than what was originally expected. Captain Delafield created the second version of the fort, which is the pentagonal one that remains there today, between 1848 and 1859 even though they didn’t declare it as finished until 1868.

Today, it is believed that Fort Delaware is one of the most haunted areas in the state, and its dungeons are probably the most active area. Prisoners were kept there without any water or beds. They were forced to sleep on the floor along with the filth and vermin, so it’s safe to say that disease and death were very common.

During the Civil War, the Fort went from protector to prison, and the prison became home to Confederate prisons, along with convicted federal soldiers, and local political prisoners. The first prisoners were held in empty powder magazines, sealed off casements, and two small rooms in the sally port. You can still see the names of Confederate soldiers carved in the walls of those rooms. Brigadier General Johnston Pettigrew was the first Confederate general to be housed there. Throughout the war, around a dozen generals were held captive there.

They eventually built barracks and a hospital on the grounds. One set of barracks was for the Confederate POWs and the other was for Union soldiers who stood guard over the POWs. Most of the Confederates who were captured during the battle of Gettysburg were held here.

By the end of the war, the fort had held around 33,000 prisoners. Of those, about 2,500 died. A smallpox outbreak in 1863 killed 272 of the prisoners. Lung inflammation killed 243. Various types of diahrrea killed 315. Around 215 prisoners died from malaria and/or typhoid. Other causes of death included erysipelas (47), pneumonia (61), and scurvy (70). Five of the prisoners drowned and seven others were shot to death. Also, 109 Union soldiers died on the grounds, as well as 40 civilians.

A lot of people have said that they have noticed shadow figures and full-body apparitions in the dungeons and it is very common to hear voices echoing throughout the halls. Some people have even heard chains rattling.

A team of ghost hunters has even gathered quite a bit of spooky evidence from the space. It was featured on their show, “Ghost Hunters.” They caught a thermal image of a person peeking around a corner at them. One of the investigators can be seen being pulled back in some of their video clips, which you can find online. He said that something was pulling on his jacket when this happened. You can also hear the sound of chains echoing throughout the dungeon as well. Shadowy figures can also be seen darting around the space.

If you’re brave enough, you can take a tour of Fort Delaware. It’s three hours long and happens rain or shine. The only way it will be canceled is if the weather makes it dangerous for boat travel.

Much Awaited November Book Releases

November 1

Underneath The Sycamore Tree by B. Celeste

Room to Breathe by Liz Talley

November 5

Get A Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert

Leave Me Breathless by Jodi Ellen Mapas

Tell Me Everything by Amy Hatvany

Stealing Her by Rachel Van Dyken

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern

We Met in December by Rosie Curtis

November 8

Captain Dreamboat by Tawna Fenske

November 12

The Light We See by J. Lynn Bailey

November 19

Inexpressible Island by Paullina Simons

Demise of a Self-Center Playboy by Piper Rayne

November 26

Where Winter Finds You by JR Ward

The Ring by Jillian Dodd

Eight Will Fall by Sarah Harian

Spy by Danielle Steel

November 28

Ophelia by Tara Brown